Editors' Blog

Music Experiences for Persons with Alzheimer’s Disease

Music is a wonderful, non-pharmacological intervention to be considered for persons with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In order to provide appropriate and beneficial music interventions for persons with AD, it is important to understand the range of music experiences that may offer effective complementary management of symptoms associated with AD.

Crowd Sourcing Literature Reviews

Recently, the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease (JAD) solicited their readership to vote on the most influential research articles in the field of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in the last 5 years.

Last comment on 14 April 2017 by Francis Hane, PhD

Alzheimer’s Disease and Spirochetosis: A Causal Relationship

The World Health Organization [1] has declared dementia as public health priority. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most frequent cause of dementia. The challenges to governments to respond to the growing number of people with dementia are substantial. Tremendous efforts have been made in research during the last four decades highlighting important aspects of the pathogenesis of AD, but if the cause of AD is not defined, and treatments to prevent the disease are not provided, the world will face an unprecedented health-care problem by the middle of the century.

Last comment on 23 May 2017 by Lawrence Broxmeyer, MD

What is wrong with Alzheimer’s disease clinical research?

There is increasing concern not only in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) research, but all of modern investigations, that false findings may be the majority or even the vast majority of published research claims [1].

Last comment on 15 April 2017 by Markku Kurkinen, PhD

Applying Quantitative Neuroimaging in Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer’s

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia and remains incurable. Its prevalence is rising, current afflicting 5 million Americans with projections to affect millions more as the population ages [1].

When do we diagnose severe Alzheimer's disease?

Among patients diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the percentage in the severe stage ranges from 28% [1] to 33% [2] to a maximum of 50% [3]. In institutionalized patients, prevalence is higher, with an estimated 75% of patients with severe AD [4].

Last comment on 2 December 2016 by Maheen Adamson, PhD

I eat, therefore I am a nutrition expert

There is no doubt that nutrition is involved in brain health and the development of neurodegenerative diseases. This is an important area of research in the dementia field that has suffered from the absence of trained experts in nutrition and nutritional epidemiology.

Last comment on 30 September 2016 by Thomas B. Shea, PhD

The case for a viral role in Alzheimer's disease

Most of us harbour in our body several types of herpes virus—perhaps as many as five—and we provide them with a safe and secluded haven for life, as there are no methods for eliminating or expelling them.

Last comment on 19 August 2016 by Brian Balin, PhD

Molecular Neuroresilience Biomarkers and the Prediction of Brain Health Across Lifespan

The ability to maintain normal psychological and physical functioning and avoid serious mental illness when exposed to stress and trauma, a phenomenon known as resilience, is a topic that has been investigated over the past several years with increasing attention [1,2].

Last comment on 5 August 2016 by Heather Snyder, Ph.D.

Is sporadic Alzheimer’s disease a form of diabetes?

Due to the aging of the population and to unhealthy lifestyle habits, age-related metabolic and neurodegenerative diseases are a growing and alarming problem around the globe.

Last comment on 23 May 2017 by Lawrence Broxmeyer, MD

Happy Fathers’ Day, 2016 , World Peace, and the Need to Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease

On this Fathers’ Day, June 19, 2016, I would like to share a revelation that I had in college, at the University of California, Berkeley, in the anti-war days of the late 1960s.

Early diagnosis, timely diagnosis, or personalized diagnosis in AD?

As disease-modifying drugs are crucially missing from the pipeline of treatments available for people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or related disorders, physicians, scientists, and public health experts are promoting the concept of early diagnosis.

Last comment on 29 April 2016 by Philip Scheltens, Prof.dr

Can Alzheimer’s-in-a-dish models accelerate AD drug discovery?

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) transgenic mice have been used as a standard model for AD drug discovery and basic mechanistic studies. These mouse models overexpress amyloid β precursor protein (APP) or APP/presenilin (PS) with single or multiple familial AD (FAD) mutations, which lead to excess accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ), a well-known driver for AD pathogenesis.

Last comment on 8 April 2016 by Christopher Navara

Early and Late Onset Alzheimer’s Disease: Two Different Entities?

The first case of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a 51-year-old woman, was described in 1906. For several years, AD was assumed to be a rare form of presenile dementia.

Last comment on 19 February 2016 by Gianluigi Zanusso, Medical

Extracellular Tau Spreading

The microtubule-associated protein tau is mainly expressed within neurons where it performs its physiological function of microtubule stability. However, extracellular tau is found in models of tau overexpression in which neuronal degeneration and cell death is prominent.

Last comment on 8 January 2016 by Alejandra Alonso, PhD

Time to Dismount

The field of Alzheimer research has reached an impasse after more than 100,000 clinical and scientific papers published in the last 40 years, because there is yet no hope, no effective treatment, and no knowledge of what causes this dementia.

Last comment on 24 November 2015 by Gustavo Román, MD, DrHC

Is There Alzheimer’s Disease?

Of course there is, but, as the expression goes, “It’s complicated”. Our contention is that Alzheimer’s is more of a disease of minds than a disease of brains.

Last comment on 5 February 2016 by J. Wesson Ashford, MD, PhD

Diagnosing Subjective Cognitive Impairment: A Non-Dementia Related Context

For most people, older adulthood is associated with some decline in memory and in some aspects of cognitive function. These are age-related changes [1] that are widely expected, understood, and accepted by the general public.

Last comment on 16 October 2015 by Amy Jenkins, MSc MSc PhD

Protecting Progress

Over the past few years there has been tremendous progress in diagnosis and therapeutic trials on Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related dementias. Overall, the cost/benefit relationship is shifting with success.

Last comment on 21 October 2016 by Allyson Rosen, PhD, ABPP-CN

Depression in Alzheimer's Disease

Depression in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has a substantial impact on disability, disease progression, and caregiver burden. Furthermore, depressive symptoms in normal aging, as well as in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), are associated with cognitive and functional decline.

Introducing the JAD Editors' Blog

Two hundred issues and nearly twenty years have positioned JAD at the center of printed and electronic peer-reviewed publications in Alzheimer's disease, as a venue that reflects the breadth of research in the field worldwide.

Last comment on 28 March 2017 by Lawrence Broxmeyer, MD