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19 May 2017

Can Omega-3 Help Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease? Brain SPECT Imaging Shows Possible Link

The incidence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is expected to triple in the coming decades and no cure has been found. Recently, interest in dietary approaches for prevention of cognitive decline has increased. In particular, the omega-3 fatty acids have shown anti-amyloid, anti-tau and anti-inflammatory actions in the brains of animals. In a new article published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, researchers have found that for patients with high omega-3 levels, blood flow in specific areas of the brain is increased.

8 May 2017

Prediction of Conversion to Alzheimer’s Disease with Longitudinal Measures and Time-To-Event Data

Sheng Luo

Predicting the timing of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) conversion for individuals with mild cognitive impairment can be significantly improved by incorporating longitudinal change information of clinical and neuroimaging markers, in addition to baseline characteristics, according to projections made by investigators from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. The research team describes how their novel statistical models found that longitudinal measurements of ADAS-Cog was the strongest predictor for AD progression and the predictive utility was consistently significant with progression of disease.

4 May 2017

Better quality relationships associated with reduced dementia risk

University of East Anglia

Positive social support from adult children is associated with reduced risk of developing dementia, according to a new research published today. Conversely, negative social support is linked with increased risk, according to the 10-year follow-up study carried out by a team of researchers from the University of East Anglia (UEA), University College London (UCL), London Metropolitan University and the University of Nottingham.

14 April 2017

Detecting Alzheimer’s disease earlier using … Greebles?

Emily Mason

Unique graphic characters called Greebles may prove to be valuable tools in detecting signs of Alzheimer’s disease decades before symptoms become apparent. In an article published online last week in JAD, Emily Mason, Ph.D., a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Louisville, reported research showing that cognitively normal people who have a genetic predisposition for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have more difficulty distinguishing among novel figures called Greebles than individuals without genetic predisposition.

21 March 2017

3D Signatures’s TeloViewTM software identifies and stages patients with Alzheimer’s disease from a cheek swab

3D Signatures Inc. (TSXV:DXD; OTCQB:TDSGF; FSE:3D0) (the "Company" or "3DS"), is pleased to announce clinical study results which confirm that based on a swab from the inside of a patient’s cheek, its proprietary TeloViewTM software platform has the ability to identify patients with Alzheimer’s disease (“AD”) and, furthermore, distinguish between mild, moderate, and severe forms of the disease.

21 March 2017

Insulin Resistance May Lead to Faster Cognitive Decline

Prof. David Tanne

A new Tel Aviv University study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease finds that insulin resistance, caused in part by obesity and physical inactivity, is also linked to a more rapid decline in cognitive performance. According to the research, both diabetic and non-diabetic subjects with insulin resistance experienced accelerated cognitive decline in executive function and memory.

28 February 2017

Mayo Clinic publishes genetic screen for Alzheimer’s in African-Americans

Nilufer Ertekin-Taner

A Mayo Clinic research team has found a new gene mutation that may be a risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease in African-Americans. This is the first time this gene has been implicated in the development of this disease in this population. Alzheimer’s disease has been understudied in African-Americans, despite the fact that the disease is twice as prevalent in African-Americans, compared to Caucasians and other ethnic groups.

23 February 2017

Alzheimer’s drug prescribed ‘off-label’ for mild cognitive impairment could pose risk for some

Sophie Sokolow

Donepezil, a medication that is approved to treat people with Alzheimer’s disease, should not be prescribed for people with mild cognitive impairment without a genetic test. UCLA School of Nursing researchers discovered that for people who carry a specific genetic variation — the K-variant of butyrylcholinesterase, or BChE-K — donezpezil could accelerate cognitive decline.

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