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16 February 2017

Validation of suspected somatic single nucleotide variations in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease patients

It has been proposed that somatic gene variations (SNV) present in few brain cells could facilitate the development of neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s disease. Testing that hypothesis requires DNA sequencing directly in brain cells or tissue rather than in blood cells. However, the identification of SNV by standard and reliable sequencing procedures does not work well when the number of cells bearing the specific SNV (or mutation) is very low within the tissue. In this way, another techniques, such as high-throughput methods, could be used. However, those methods can introduce errors in reading sequence alignments that can interfere with the identification of true somatic variations.

15 February 2017

Is it Depression or Dementia? Brain SPECT Imaging Helps Distinguish Them

Does a patient have depression or a cognitive disorder (CD) such as Alzheimer’s disease or both? Since both disorders have overlapping symptoms, how can a clinician tell them apart to make an appropriate diagnosis? In a new article published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, researchers have found that single photon emission computed tomography, or SPECT, can help to distinguish between these diagnostic categories.

26 January 2017

Deep Brain Stimulation Studies in Alzheimer’s Disease Pose Ethical Challenges

Andrew M. Siegel, MD

Promising, early studies of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease have paved a path for future clinical trials, but there are unique ethical challenges with this vulnerable population regarding decision making and post-study treatment access that need to be addressed as they ramp up, Penn Medicine researchers argue in a new review in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

22 December 2016

Occupational therapy may have the potential to slow down functional decline and reduce behavioral troubles in dementia patients

A French observational study in real life showed that dementia patients benefiting from occupational therapy sessions report relevant clinical benefits over the intervention period, according to a research study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease this month. The research suggested the influence of occupational therapy on reducing behavioral troubles, caregivers’ burden and amount of informal care over the intervention period and a stabilization over the 3-months period thereafter.

21 December 2016

Penn Study Confirms That “Sniff Test” May Be Useful in Diagnosing Early Alzheimer’s Disease

David R. Roalf

Tests that measure the sense of smell may soon become common in neurologists’ offices. Scientists have been finding increasing evidence that the sense of smell declines sharply in the early stages of Alzheimer’s, and now a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania published today in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease confirms that administering a simple “sniff test” can enhance the accuracy of diagnosing this dreaded disease.

19 December 2016

JAD’s Alzheimer Funding Analyzer Now Includes Alzheimer’s Association Grants

Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease (JAD) is pleased to announce that its Alzheimer’s Funding Analyzer (AFA) now includes all Alzheimer’s Association (AA) grants in addition to grants from other funding bodies. AFA is a free service that is part of a suite of online features integrated into the JAD site to meet the needs of the Alzheimer disease (AD) research community.

16 December 2016

Antipsychotic drug use increases risk of mortality among persons with Alzheimer’s disease

University of Eastern Finland

Antipsychotic drug use is associated with a 60 percent increased risk of mortality among persons with Alzheimer's disease, shows a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. The risk was highest at the beginning of drug use and remained increased in long-term use. Use of two or more antipsychotic drugs concomitantly was associated with almost two times higher risk of mortality than monotherapy. The results were published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

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