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8 May 2017

Prediction of Conversion to Alzheimer’s Disease with Longitudinal Measures and Time-To-Event Data

Sheng Luo

Predicting the timing of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) conversion for individuals with mild cognitive impairment can be significantly improved by incorporating longitudinal change information of clinical and neuroimaging markers, in addition to baseline characteristics, according to projections made by investigators from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. The research team describes how their novel statistical models found that longitudinal measurements of ADAS-Cog was the strongest predictor for AD progression and the predictive utility was consistently significant with progression of disease.

4 May 2017

Better quality relationships associated with reduced dementia risk

University of East Anglia

Positive social support from adult children is associated with reduced risk of developing dementia, according to a new research published today. Conversely, negative social support is linked with increased risk, according to the 10-year follow-up study carried out by a team of researchers from the University of East Anglia (UEA), University College London (UCL), London Metropolitan University and the University of Nottingham.

14 April 2017

Detecting Alzheimer’s disease earlier using … Greebles?

Emily Mason

Unique graphic characters called Greebles may prove to be valuable tools in detecting signs of Alzheimer’s disease decades before symptoms become apparent. In an article published online last week in JAD, Emily Mason, Ph.D., a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Louisville, reported research showing that cognitively normal people who have a genetic predisposition for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have more difficulty distinguishing among novel figures called Greebles than individuals without genetic predisposition.

21 March 2017

3D Signatures’s TeloViewTM software identifies and stages patients with Alzheimer’s disease from a cheek swab

3D Signatures Inc. (TSXV:DXD; OTCQB:TDSGF; FSE:3D0) (the "Company" or "3DS"), is pleased to announce clinical study results which confirm that based on a swab from the inside of a patient’s cheek, its proprietary TeloViewTM software platform has the ability to identify patients with Alzheimer’s disease (“AD”) and, furthermore, distinguish between mild, moderate, and severe forms of the disease.

21 March 2017

Insulin Resistance May Lead to Faster Cognitive Decline

Prof. David Tanne

A new Tel Aviv University study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease finds that insulin resistance, caused in part by obesity and physical inactivity, is also linked to a more rapid decline in cognitive performance. According to the research, both diabetic and non-diabetic subjects with insulin resistance experienced accelerated cognitive decline in executive function and memory.

28 February 2017

Mayo Clinic publishes genetic screen for Alzheimer’s in African-Americans

Nilufer Ertekin-Taner

A Mayo Clinic research team has found a new gene mutation that may be a risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease in African-Americans. This is the first time this gene has been implicated in the development of this disease in this population. Alzheimer’s disease has been understudied in African-Americans, despite the fact that the disease is twice as prevalent in African-Americans, compared to Caucasians and other ethnic groups.

23 February 2017

Alzheimer’s drug prescribed ‘off-label’ for mild cognitive impairment could pose risk for some

Sophie Sokolow

Donepezil, a medication that is approved to treat people with Alzheimer’s disease, should not be prescribed for people with mild cognitive impairment without a genetic test. UCLA School of Nursing researchers discovered that for people who carry a specific genetic variation — the K-variant of butyrylcholinesterase, or BChE-K — donezpezil could accelerate cognitive decline.

23 February 2017

Mild cognitive impairment, a condition that often predates Alzheimer’s disease, can be remotely detected through a self-administered virtual reality brain training game

Greek researchers demonstrated the potential of a self-administered virtual supermarket cognitive training game for remotely detecting mild cognitive impairment (MCI), without the need for an examiner, among a sample of older adults. MCI patients suffer from cognitive problems and often encounter difficulties in performing complex activities such as financial planning. They are at a high risk for progressing to dementia however early detection of MCI and suitable interventions can stabilize the patients’ condition and prevent further decline.

16 February 2017

Validation of suspected somatic single nucleotide variations in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease patients

It has been proposed that somatic gene variations (SNV) present in few brain cells could facilitate the development of neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s disease. Testing that hypothesis requires DNA sequencing directly in brain cells or tissue rather than in blood cells. However, the identification of SNV by standard and reliable sequencing procedures does not work well when the number of cells bearing the specific SNV (or mutation) is very low within the tissue. In this way, another techniques, such as high-throughput methods, could be used. However, those methods can introduce errors in reading sequence alignments that can interfere with the identification of true somatic variations.

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