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8 February 2021

Research Establishes a New Method to Predict Individual Risk of Cognitive Decline

The early prognosis of high-risk older adults for amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), using noninvasive and sensitive neuromarkers, is key for early prevention of Alzheimer’s disease. A recent study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, by researchers at the University of Kentucky establishes what they believe is a new way to predict the risk years before a clinical diagnosis. Their work shows that direct measures of brain signatures during mental activity are more sensitive and accurate predictors of memory decline than current standard behavioral testing.

8 February 2021

Air Pollution Poses Risk to Thinking Skills in Later Life, a Study Says

Exposure to air pollution in childhood is linked to a decline in thinking skills in later life, a study suggests. A greater exposure to air pollution at the very start of life was associated with a detrimental effect on people’s cognitive skills up to 60 years later, the research found. Researchers at the University of Edinburgh tested the general intelligence of more than 500 people aged approximately 70 years using a test they had all completed at the age of 11 years.

3 February 2021

Psychological Distress of Lockdown in Pre-Dementia Patients Prolonged During the COVID-19 De-Escalation

Natalia Soldevila-Domènech and Rafael de la Torre

The effects of the lockdown decreed to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of elderly people in pre-dementia stages were protracted during the de-escalation phase. This is highlighted by a study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, led by researchers from the Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM) and doctors from Hospital del Mar, as well as researchers from the CIBER on the Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN) and the CIBER on Fragility and Healthy Ageing (CIBERFES). The work was carried out in collaboration with the Barcelona βeta Brain Research Center (BBRC).

2 February 2021

Dementia Rates Higher in Men with Common Genetic Disorder Haemochromatosis

New research has found that men who have the Western world’s most common genetic disorder are more likely to develop dementia, compared to those without the faulty genes. Researchers at the University of Exeter and the University of Connecticut have previously found that men with two faulty genes that cause the iron overload condition haemochromatosis are more likely to develop liver cancer, arthritis and frailty, compared to those without the faulty genes. Now, the team’s new analysis has found that men who carry the two faulty genes that cause haemochromatosis are more likely to develop dementia than men who do not carry any copies of the faulty gene.

29 January 2021

An Integrated Approach for an Effective Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease

This new pioneering study by Prof. Ricardo Maccioni and coworkers of the International Center for Biomedicine will be published in a JAD special issue featuring Latin American investigators. This supports a growing body of research on the Alzheimer’s prevention value of an integrated approach using daily exercise, nutraceuticals, oriental practices such as QiGong along with meditation, and social life. These elements of a healthy style of life are supplemented with the use of reliable biomarkers for early detection of this disease that allows to detection Alzheimer's up to 20 years before symptomatic phase of the disease.

21 January 2021

New Study Shows the Relationship Between Surgery and Alzheimer's Disease

A new study published in JAD carried out by researchers at the Marqués de Valdecilla-IDIVAL University Hospital, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Bonn Medical Center, proposes that major surgery is a promoter or accelerator of Alzheimer's disease. The first author of the publication was Carmen Lage and the principal investigator Pascual Sánchez-Juan.

14 January 2021

Approximately Half of AD Dementia Cases are Mild, One-fifth are Severe

What percent of patients with Alzheimer’s disease currently have severe dementia? Do more people have mild disease? Or are the majority suffering with moderate dementia? A new study using data from the Framingham Heart Study sheds light on these trends. Boston University School of Medicine researchers have found that slightly more than half (50.4 percent) of cases are mild, just under one-third (30.3 percent) of cases are moderate and 19.3 percent are severe cases.

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