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26 May 2020

Uncovering Alzheimer’s Disease

Yuksel Agca

Characterized by a buildup of amyloid plaques in the brain, Alzheimer’s is an irreversible disease that leads to memory loss and a decrease in cognitive function. More than 5 million Americans suffer with the brain condition, which is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. While the causes of Alzheimer’s are not fully understood, scientists believe genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors are involved in the disease’s development.

20 May 2020

Exercise Improves Memory, Boosts Blood Flow to Brain

Dr. Binu Thomas, UT Southwestern senior research scientist

Scientists have collected plenty of evidence linking exercise to brain health, with some research suggesting fitness may even improve memory. But what happens during exercise to trigger these benefits? New UT Southwestern research that mapped brain changes after one year of aerobic workouts has uncovered a potentially critical process: Exercise boosts blood flow into two key regions of the brain associated with memory. Notably, the study showed this blood flow can help even older people with memory issues improve cognition, a finding that scientists say could guide future Alzheimer’s disease research.

6 May 2020

Cortexyme Publishes Data on P. gingivalis' Ability to Infect Neurons, drive Alzheimer’s-Like Pathology

Cortexyme, Inc., a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company pioneering a novel, disease-modifying therapeutic approach to treat what it believes to be a key underlying cause of Alzheimer’s disease and other degenerative diseases, today announced the publication of research further documenting the ability of the pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis to invade neurons and trigger Alzheimer’s-like neuropathology.

7 April 2020

Exercise Reduces Caregiver’s Burden in Dementia Care

Exercise in older adults, even at an advanced stage of dementia, is an important strategy to maintain independence in everyday living and to promote quality of life. The research group "geriatric psychiatry in motion" of the German Sport University Cologne and the LVR-Hospital Cologne develop and evaluate exercise programs for geriatric mental health care. Latest results from a study in acute dementia care indicate a special exercise program is not only effective for the patients themselves, but also reduces the professional caregiver’s burden caused by neuropsychiatric symptoms.

14 February 2020

Can Lithium Halt Progression of Alzheimer's Disease?

A study published in JAD from researchers at McGill University led by Dr. Claudio Cuello of the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, has shown that, when given in a formulation that facilitates passage to the brain, lithium in doses up to 400 times lower than what is currently being prescribed for mood disorders is capable of both halting signs of advanced Alzheimer's pathology such as amyloid plaques and of recovering lost cognitive abilities.

20 January 2020

Human Exposure to Aluminum Linked to Familial Alzheimer’s Disease

JAD press release

A new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (JAD) supports a growing body of research that links human exposure to aluminum with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Researchers found significant amounts of aluminum content in brain tissue from donors with familial AD. The study also found a high degree of co-location with the amyloid-beta protein, which leads to early onset of the disease.

27 November 2019

New Study Shows a Minimum Dose of Hydromethylthionine Could Slow Cognitive Decline and Brain Atrophy in Mild-to-Moderate Alzheimer's Disease

TauRx has reported unexpected results of a pharmacokinetic analysis of the relationship between treatment dose, blood levels and pharmacological activity of the drug hydromethylthionine on the brain in over 1,000 patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s disease. These results showed that the drug produced concentration-dependent effects on cognitive decline and brain atrophy.

26 November 2019

Psychological Well-Being at 52 Years Could Impact on Cognitive Functioning at 69 Years

Miharu Nakanishi, Chief Researcher of Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, and her colleagues finds that psychological well-being at 52 years were prospectively associated with cognitive function at 69 years. The authors used data in women from the British 1946 birth cohort in the Medical Research Council’s National Survey of Health and Development. There was a significant association between greater personal growth and lower self-acceptance at 52 years, and better cognition at 69 years.

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