Latest News

20 November 2019

Oligomerix and Feinstein Institutes Publish In Vivo Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment Data

Oligomerix, Inc. and the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research announced today the publication of preclinical data demonstrating that an oral small molecule drug inhibits the formation of neurotoxic tau oligomers in an animal model of tau aggregation most relevant to AD. The study showed that the compound blocked tau self-association, which is the earliest step in the toxic tau aggregation cascade, and inhibited the downstream events that lead to tau fibril formation.

14 November 2019

Getting to the "Art" of Dementia: UC Researchers Highlight Benefits of Art Intervention

University of Canberra researchers have shown that art gallery programs can improve the wellbeing of people living with dementia – and they’ve backed it up by testing study participants’ saliva. Published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, the UC study monitored new participants of the National Gallery of Australia’s (NGA) Art and Dementia program over six weeks. The NGA program has been running for more than 12 years and has demonstrated anecdotal and observational benefits, now backed up by UC research.

28 October 2019

Looking at the Way We Walk Can Help Predict Cognitive Decline

The way people walk is an indicator of how much their brains, as well as their bodies, are aging. Scientists reporting in a JAD special supplement say that gait disorders, particularly slowing gait, should be considered a marker of future cognitive decline. They propose testing motor performance as well as cognitive performance in older adults with mild cognitive impairments.

23 October 2019

Study Identifies Brain Injury as a Cause of Dementia in Some Older Adults

A UCLA-led study finds that, with the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, it is possible to distinguish between memory loss caused by Alzheimer’s disease and traumatic brain injury. Researchers from UCLA, along with colleagues at Washington University in St. Louis, say the finding is important because it could help prevent a misdiagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, which can be devastating for patients and their families. One study found that as many as 21 percent of older adults with dementia may be misdiagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. A misdiagnosis can result in patients not receiving the appropriate treatment, and prevents them from participating in clinical trials that could improve their overall care.

21 October 2019

Two of a Kind: Emory Study of Twins Shows What’s Good for the Heart is Good for the Brain

Emory University researchers are giving us double the reasons to pay attention to our cardiovascular health – showing in a recently published study in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease that good heart health can equal good brain health. By studying pairs of twin brothers from the Vietnam Era Twin (VET) registry, researchers were able to observe the relationship between cardiovascular health and cognitive performance across all participants that may be explained by genetics and/or exposures or behaviors that are shared by members of the same family.

17 September 2019

Exercise Could Slow Withering Effects of Alzheimer’s

Dr. Rong Zhang

Exercising several times a week may delay brain deterioration in people at high risk for Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study that scientists say merits further research to establish whether fitness can affect the progression of dementia. Research from UT Southwestern found that people who had accumulation of amyloid beta in the brain – a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease – experienced slower degeneration in a region of the brain crucial for memory if they exercised regularly for one year.

17 September 2019

Alzheimer’s Memory Loss Reversed by New Head Device Using Electromagnetic Waves

There is finally some encouraging news for the millions of Americans suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease. NeuroEM Therapeutics today announced findings from an open label clinical trial showing reversal of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease patients after just two months of treatment using the company’s wearable head device for in-home treatment.

3 September 2019

New Insights: Dementia, Risk, Risk Reduction, and Translation into Practice

Globally, dementia cases are increasing at a rate of more than 20% a year. Most of these cases are in low- to middle-income countries. In a special supplement to the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, from the International Research Network on Dementia Prevention (IRNDP), an international group of scientists presents new research from around the world examining the potential risk factors for dementia and how to reduce them.

23 August 2019

Low Grip Strength Linked to Impaired Cognition, Memory Loss in Older Americans

For older Americans, poor handgrip may be a sign of impaired cognition and memory, a new study suggests. Researchers from the University of Michigan and North Dakota State University followed nearly 14,000 participants from the 2006 Health and Retirement Study, age 50 and older, for eight years. They found that every 5-kg reduction in handgrip strength was associated with 10% greater odds for any cognitive impairment and 18% greater odds for severe cognitive impairment.

Pages

Subscribe to Latest News