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28 November 2017

Severity of Post-Operative Delirium Relates to Severity of Cognitive Decline

Researchers from the Harvard affiliated Hebrew SeniorLife Institute for Aging Research (IFAR), in collaboration with scientists from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), Harvard Medical School (HMS), and Brown University, have found increasing evidence that the level of delirium in post-surgical patients is associated with the level of later cognitive decline in those same patients. Findings from this study were published today in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

15 September 2017

Decreased Glucose Metabolism in Medial Prefrontal Areas is Associated with Nutritional Status in Patients with Prodromal and Early Alzheimer’s Disease: results from MULNIAD study

A new study from the Multimodal Neuroimaging for AD Diagnosis (MULNIAD) study, which is a prospective study implemented at the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology (NCGG), provides that hypometabolism in the medial prefrontal areas is specifically associated with Alzheimer’s disease-related nutritional problems, and decrease in fat mass may have a key role. This study is published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

6 September 2017

Overcoming Barriers to Recruiting Blacks/African-Americans for Dementia Research

Eseosa Ighodaro

In a paper published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, lead author Eseosa Ighodaro, PhD, encouraged fellow researchers to address the challenges associated with studying dementia in Blacks/African-Americans. The paper, co-authored by researchers at the University of Kentucky's Sanders-Brown Center on Aging, the University of Washington, Rice University, and Rush University Medical Center, is a clear-eyed look at the barriers that hinder minority recruitment for dementia research and the misconceptions that potentially distort research outcomes through unintended bias.

2 August 2017

For White Middle Class, Moderate Drinking Is Linked to Cognitive Health in Old Age

wine glass

Older adults who consume alcohol moderately on a regular basis are more likely to live to the age of 85 without dementia or other cognitive impairments than non-drinkers, according to a University of California San Diego School of Medicine-led study. The findings are published in the August issue of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.

1 August 2017

Vascular Risk Factors and Alzheimer's Disease: A New Therapeutic Opportunity?

Currently, no possibility exists to reliably quantify the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) onset in the general population and in subjects with mild cognitive impairment. Metabolic and genetic factors involved in increasing the probability of developing dementia have already been identified. Some vascular risk factors, as hypertension, dyslipidaemia, diabetes or smoking can cause a derangement in extra or intracranial vessels architecture, which can be responsible for an early aging of the brain. However, reliable tools for early identification of subjects at greater risk of evolution from mild cognitive impairment to AD are not available.

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