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17 September 2020

The CABLE Study: Green Tea Consumption May Help Fend Off Cognitive Decline by Affecting Alzheimer’s Disease Tau Pathology

A team from the Qingdao University and Fudan University of China recruits more than 700 older adults aged 40 years or older, investigates their drinking tea habits, and assesses their cognitive function and especially alterations of aging brain pathology, i.e., Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

1 September 2020

Estrogen Replacement May Protect Against Alzheimer’s Disease in Women

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease and the leading cause of dementia. It affects more women than men. A new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease indicates that factors such as age, reproductive stage, hormone levels, and the interplay with other risk factors should be considered in women and proposes a role for early menopausal estrogen replacement to protect against the development of AD.

5 August 2020

Body Weight Has Surprising, Alarming Impact on Brain Function

As a person’s weight goes up, all regions of the brain go down in activity and blood flow, according to a new brain imaging study in JAD. One of the largest studies linking obesity with brain dysfunction, scientists analyzed over 35,000 functional neuroimaging scans using single-photon emission computerized tomography from more than 17,000 individuals to measure blood flow and brain activity.

31 July 2020

Memory Loss Reversed or Abated in those with Cognitive Decline

JADR news

Affirmativ Health sought to determine whether a comprehensive and personalized program, designed to mitigate risk factors of Alzheimer’s disease could improve cognitive and metabolic function in individuals experiencing cognitive decline. Findings published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease Reports provided evidence that this approach can improve risk factor scores and stabilize cognitive function.

8 July 2020

Christin Nance and Sarah Banks Receive 2020 Alzheimer Award

Alzheimer Award

JAD is pleased to announce that the joint recipients of the 2020 Alzheimer Award are Christin Nance, BA, and Sarah Banks, PhD. This year’s award-winning article addresses one of the primary challenges in managing AD: the variable rate of cognitive decline among patients. The 2020 winning paper is “The Pathology of Rapid Cognitive Decline in Clinically Diagnosed Alzheimer’s Disease."

12 June 2020

Three Stages to COVID-19 Brain Damage Identified by Top Neurologists in Journal of Alzheimer Disease Paper

The Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease has just published a paper with a comprehensive review of the COVID-19’s effect on the nervous system which classifies brain damage caused by COVID-19 into three stages. One of the authors, nationally-recognized neurologist Dr. Majid Fotuhi, MD, PhD, who is the medical director of NeuroGrow Brain Fitness Center in Northern Virginia and an affiliate staff at Johns Hopkins Medicine, encourages the adoption of this three-stage classification, calls for more research on COVID's long-term effects on the brain, and stresses the need for patients to receive a brain MRI before leaving the hospital.

27 May 2020

Study Results Offer New Hope for Treatment of Patients with Dementia

Claude Wischik

TauRx reported that the drug it is developing for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (hydromethylthionine) also has significant pharmacological activity in behavioural variant Fronto-Temporal Dementia (bvFTD). The study reports a pharmacokinetic analysis of the relationship between treatment dose, blood levels and pharmacological activity of the drug hydromethylthionine on the brain in 176 patients with bvFTD. The results showed that, even at the lowest dose of hydromethylthionine tested (8 mg/day), the drug (taken as a tablet) produced statistically significant concentration-dependent effects on clinical decline and brain atrophy with results similar to those reported recently in Alzheimer’s disease.

26 May 2020

Uncovering Alzheimer’s Disease

Yuksel Agca

Characterized by a buildup of amyloid plaques in the brain, Alzheimer’s is an irreversible disease that leads to memory loss and a decrease in cognitive function. More than 5 million Americans suffer with the brain condition, which is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. While the causes of Alzheimer’s are not fully understood, scientists believe genetic, lifestyle and environmental factors are involved in the disease’s development.

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