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14 February 2020

Can Lithium Halt Progression of Alzheimer's Disease?

A study published in JAD from researchers at McGill University led by Dr. Claudio Cuello of the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, has shown that, when given in a formulation that facilitates passage to the brain, lithium in doses up to 400 times lower than what is currently being prescribed for mood disorders is capable of both halting signs of advanced Alzheimer's pathology such as amyloid plaques and of recovering lost cognitive abilities.

20 January 2020

Human Exposure to Aluminum Linked to Familial Alzheimer’s Disease

JAD press release

A new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (JAD) supports a growing body of research that links human exposure to aluminum with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Researchers found significant amounts of aluminum content in brain tissue from donors with familial AD. The study also found a high degree of co-location with the amyloid-beta protein, which leads to early onset of the disease.

27 November 2019

New Study Shows a Minimum Dose of Hydromethylthionine Could Slow Cognitive Decline and Brain Atrophy in Mild-to-Moderate Alzheimer's Disease

TauRx has reported unexpected results of a pharmacokinetic analysis of the relationship between treatment dose, blood levels and pharmacological activity of the drug hydromethylthionine on the brain in over 1,000 patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s disease. These results showed that the drug produced concentration-dependent effects on cognitive decline and brain atrophy.

26 November 2019

Psychological Well-Being at 52 Years Could Impact on Cognitive Functioning at 69 Years

Miharu Nakanishi, Chief Researcher of Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, and her colleagues finds that psychological well-being at 52 years were prospectively associated with cognitive function at 69 years. The authors used data in women from the British 1946 birth cohort in the Medical Research Council’s National Survey of Health and Development. There was a significant association between greater personal growth and lower self-acceptance at 52 years, and better cognition at 69 years.

20 November 2019

Oligomerix and Feinstein Institutes Publish In Vivo Alzheimer’s Disease Treatment Data

Oligomerix, Inc. and the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research announced today the publication of preclinical data demonstrating that an oral small molecule drug inhibits the formation of neurotoxic tau oligomers in an animal model of tau aggregation most relevant to AD. The study showed that the compound blocked tau self-association, which is the earliest step in the toxic tau aggregation cascade, and inhibited the downstream events that lead to tau fibril formation.

14 November 2019

Getting to the "Art" of Dementia: UC Researchers Highlight Benefits of Art Intervention

University of Canberra researchers have shown that art gallery programs can improve the wellbeing of people living with dementia – and they’ve backed it up by testing study participants’ saliva. Published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, the UC study monitored new participants of the National Gallery of Australia’s (NGA) Art and Dementia program over six weeks. The NGA program has been running for more than 12 years and has demonstrated anecdotal and observational benefits, now backed up by UC research.

28 October 2019

Looking at the Way We Walk Can Help Predict Cognitive Decline

The way people walk is an indicator of how much their brains, as well as their bodies, are aging. Scientists reporting in a JAD special supplement say that gait disorders, particularly slowing gait, should be considered a marker of future cognitive decline. They propose testing motor performance as well as cognitive performance in older adults with mild cognitive impairments.

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